How To Hook Up Outdoor Wood Furnace To Ductwork?


Rima Chatterjee

Key Takeaways 


  • When installing, use 2-stage thermostat control and follow manufacturer instructions. Carry out routine maintenance.
  • Connecting an outdoor wood furnace is one of the most common upgrades. It’s a renewable, cost-effective heat source. To install it, you need a heat exchanger and supply + return lines.
  • You might need extra plumbing work like trenching new lines or installing brackets for support. Also, make sure you don’t exceed the peak roof line when you place the unit.
  • NCB boilers enable you to see data in real-time on a smartphone or computer.
How To Hook Up Outdoor Wood Furnace To Ductwork?

Preparation to Hook Up Outdoor Wood Furnace to Ductwork 


To hook up an outdoor wood furnace, you need to prepare your ductwork. Here’s a 5-step guide:

  1. Check the sizes and types of ducts. Ensure they don’t leak air. Make sure they’re large enough for extra air.
  2. Get the right size heat exchanger. It must transfer heat efficiently.
  3. Install back draft dampers near the combustion blower. They stop cold air from entering when there’s no fire.
  4. Put a powered damper on the supply-side plenum. It controls how much hot air goes into each zone.
  5. Add a central fan to your ductwork. It spreads warm air around your home.
  6. Remember to bury incoming pex pipe underground. Secure it with brackets every 3 feet.

When installing, use 2-stage thermostat control and follow manufacturer instructions. Carry out routine maintenance. Preparing your ductwork for an outdoor wood furnace needs care. With the right setup, you’ll be warm all winter.

Heat Exchanger Installation To Furnace


Got an outdoor wood furnace? Looking to distribute heat better? Connecting it to ductwork could be the answer. Here’s a guide to installing a heat exchanger.

  1. Figure out the size of the exchanger you need. This depends on your house’s sq. footage, climate, insulation type & quality. Buy the exchanger with some mounting brackets.
  2. Connect the exchanger to the ductwork. Put it close to the plenum on your furnace. Use a pex pipe and make sure you attach it properly to avoid leaks.
  3. Don’t forget to add a temperature control valve for peak roof-line requirements. And add a pressure-relief valve, so static pressure isn’t an issue.
  4. Check for backdraft dampers. These can help air flow from furnaces that are far away.
  5. Lay out the lines evenly to prevent kinking. Cover edges and holes with rope seals or foil tape. This will stop cold air from getting in during peak heating season.

Time to get creative! Let’s duct-tape and foil-wrap our way to success.

HVAC Ductwork Modification by Connecting Outdoor Wood Furnace


Modifying HVAC ductwork? Connecting an outdoor wood furnace is one of the most common upgrades. 

  • It’s a renewable, cost-effective heat source. 
  • To install it, you need a heat exchanger and supply + return lines. 
  • Properly size the ductwork and add fans or dampers for better airflow. 
  • Remember to comply with local codes. 
  • Plus, outdoor wood furnaces can be combined with other systems, like heat pumps or boilers. 
  • Even hydronic systems can replace ductwork for higher efficiency.

I’ve had a good experience with outdoor wood furnaces. Maintenance is easy and performance is reliable. Just need to invest in larger fuel storage and plumb new lines, or trench existing ones, for safe smoke release. So, let’s crank up the thermostat and get heating!

Adding a Pump and Thermostat to Outdoor Wood Furnace


Adding a pump and thermostat to your outdoor wood furnace is crucial for optimal performance! Here’s a table on how to get it done:

StepsHow to do it
Install a heat exchangerYou need one that will transfer heat from hot water produced by your furnace to air being distributed in your home.
Add a circulation pumpPut this on either the supply side or the return line of the heat exchanger.
Install a thermostatPut this between the furnace and air handler. Now you can control when heat is distributed throughout your home.
Connect pex pipeConnect this to both the outdoor wood boiler and the NCB boiler. Make sure everything is sealed well with foil tape and rope seals.
Install dampersUse backdraft dampers or powered dampers to regulate airflow. This will ensure heated air is flowing through your ducts without any obstructions or leaks.

You might need extra plumbing work like trenching new lines or installing brackets for support. Also, make sure you don’t exceed the peak roof line when you place the unit.

Don’t miss out on optimizing your outdoor wood furnace! Take control of your heating system now, so that FOMO won’t get the best of you!

Testing and Maintenance of Outdoor Wood Furnace


Testing and maintaining your outdoor wood furnace is key for top performance and system longevity. 

  1. Check the heat exchanger, supply ducts, and air filter
  2. Also, inspect insulation around ducts and rope seals on doors
  3. Test the blower and add backdraft dampers to boost efficiency.
  4. Regular maintenance includes cleaning the combustion chambers, testing wiring connections, and lubricating moving parts. 
  5. Check for leaks in water lines or air ducts, too. These can affect indoor temperature.
  6. NCB boilers enable you to see data in real time on a smartphone or computer. This new tech helps control and optimize performance.

I once neglected my outdoor furnace’s maintenance needs, and this led to fire and smoke issues. I understand how crucial it is to prioritize upkeep for safety.

Optional add-ons to an outdoor wood furnace may not be necessary, but they look cool!

Optional Add-Ons to Outdoor Wood Furnace


Enhance the performance and efficiency of your outdoor wood furnace by adding additional features. 

  1. Connect a heat pump or a hot water storage tank to boost the heating and hot water supply. 
  2. Foil tape on all duct joints, along with rope seals for doors, will provide optimal efficiency. 
  3. Air sealing any cold air returns in existing HVAC systems will save energy.

A popular history of outdoor furnaces began in Jun ’86. Randy Buchanan, together with his wife Jan, created the first model outside a client’s garage after a power outage caused by an ice storm. Months of perfecting it led to the thousands of furnaces we see today, across diverse settings around the world.

Conclusion


When installing, use 2-stage thermostat control and follow manufacturer instructions. Carry out routine maintenance. Connecting an outdoor wood furnace is one of the most common upgrades. It’s a renewable, cost-effective heat source. To install it, you need a heat exchanger and supply + return lines. You might need extra plumbing work like trenching new lines or installing brackets for support. Also, make sure you don’t exceed the peak roof line when you place the unit. NCB boilers enable you to see data in real time on a smartphone or computer.

About the author

Debarghya Roy: A heating systems author, Passionate about energy efficiency and sustainability, Sharing insights and empowering readers through informative blog articles.